Posts

Time Trials Will Test You (for the better)

By Angela Lilly

I have tried to keep triathlete growth both in mind and in training up to speed regularly over this season, however I feel it’s time to dig a bit deeper than social media so here’s an article.

The last month was a lot of planning of training and racing and life. We get used to racing by age group but MSC keeps us chasing new goals and challenges as they offer their unique “time trial start” at the Bracebridge triathlon.  When I first started racing this years ago, I was concerned that I was in a 15-minute deficit and I had so many more challenges than my fellow friends/racers. Now, I’ve found strength in this format of race. Here’s some points to share about why you should try a TT:

  1. The swim is really spread out in beautiful water.
  2. The exit of the swim is exciting; lots of spectators and lots of bikes gone off the rack.
  3. The bike course is very positive and sportsman-like. I once found that I raced courses that I would call encouraging words to other racers as I passed them, or they passed me, and they would be silent.  In MSC racing, it is wonderful.  We must all pass through an imaginary beam of light as we walk over the starting mat that beams us up for a personal best day.  In MSC racing, if there is a pass, both triathletes are encouraging to one another.
  4. The bike course is full, but it isn’t as tough to ride as “full-wave start” races. It’s much more spread out, less chance you get caught in a drafting situation, safer, and if you pay enough attention, you can even follow the triathlete ahead of you and ride a good line (no pot holes or cracks in the road).
  5. The run makes you truly race your best with what you have left. You always know your pace depending on the distance; however, I have found TT races to push you beyond that zone. I find someone ahead of me and try to push my pace by 5 seconds. If I get passed, then I tuck in behind them and try to feel their strength to run better than I was (there are the triathletes that are always faster runners than me and those ones I have to let go because I don’t want to completely blow up). Don’t try to push it or race by yourself.  There are hundreds of people on course so make a friend and quickly talk.  Find out where each other is at and help one another. MSC has so many great triathletes that have made me push it till the last second at the finish line.  I hope I too, have done the same for others.
  6. The race truly isn’t done until the finish line and this is even more powerful when it is a time trial as you can’t possibly know if someone has beaten you by 10 seconds or 3 minutes. It’s up to you to push your limits till the final line. Sportstats will take care of the rest.

I treated my next race the same way and good things happened; personal best time!

Now that we are on to our final races of 2019 triathlon season in Ontario, race your triathlon like a TT.  It will hurt but you will achieve more than you set out to achieve.  What a great way to complete 2019!

Open Water Swim Workouts with Andrew Bolton

Rock Your Best Swim at the Barrelman’s Swim Course

Figure 1.  Welland International Flatwater Centre where Barrelman racers will swim 2 km in a rectangular course.

Figure 1.  Welland International Flatwater Centre where Barrelman racers will swim 2 km in a rectangular course.  Underwater cable is available for most of the course to, which racers can follow without excessive sighting.

It is August, and many Barrelman racers are also deep into their training. With work, family, life, and triathlon training all require one’s time and attention, a fundamental aspect of training is keeping yourself motivated to make the time to work out while also balancing everyday responsibilities. To this end, this article serves two purposes: (1) to offer some specifics in the Barrelman’s race site at the Welland International Flatwater Centre (WIFC) that may be useful to triathletes, and (2) to offer a simple (no brainer) swim workout that can be used by anyone in the pool or in open water.

Based on my regular open water training swims at WIFC, knowing a few things particular to the center can help you make the most of your training and racing.

Figure 2.  Meter markers at the bank of the canal.

Figure 2.  Meter markers at the bank of the canal.

Figure 3.  Meter marker on the opposite side of the canal.

Figure 3. Meter marker on the opposite side of the canal. Large buoys are placed at the meter to denote the distance traversed in the water.  

Many triathletes and pool swimmers, including myself, desire to know the distance they are swimming and how fast they are going. While it is more challenging to measure speed and distance in open water, WIFC marks distances at several points:  *200 m, 250 m, *500 m, 750 m, and *1,000 m. [1] The distances marked at WIFC make it easier to swim intervals at varying speeds in open water (similar to a pool workout), which breaks up the monotony of swimming a single speed and is more beneficial for conditioning. For example, tonight I swam 8 x 200 at faster-than-race pace as a workout. On race day, the markers palso provide distance information to aid in pacing, which is important for many participants in Barrelman.

In addition to meter markers along the shore, WIFC also places buoys (Figure 4) in the water both lengthwise and widthwise. Buoys placed along the width of the canal (Figure 3) demarcate separate lanes for swimming, rowing and other aquatic activities. Buoys throughout the length of the canal are anchored to the cables and spaced 25 m apart, which aids in measuring distance per stroke and provides a more precise measurement between meter markers.

Figure 4.  The buoys in the water demarcate the rowing/swimming lanes at WIFC

Figure 4. The buoys in the water demarcate the rowing/swimming lanes at WIFC, with small buoys approximately 25 m apart.  

The precise measurements at WIFC allow you to work out much like you would in a pool. Whether you are training at WIFC on a regular basis, or from your local swimming pool, here is a no brainer workout that I used from time to time:

x (m*100), 25 build + 25 distance per stroke + 25 fast + 25 decelerate, with 15 seconds rest , where n is the number of reps, and m is the distance (in 100s) per rep (i.e., if = 3, you are doing x 300)

This workout provides a lot of flexibility in stroke choice, distance per rep, number of reps, technical emphasis, and even rest interval. This main set is scalable in three ways: (1) swim nx 100’s as many times as one desires in one workout, e.g. ranging from = 5 to = 20+;  (2) one may scale the workout, such as x 200 or a longer distance for a more challenging workout; and (3) after repeating this workout for a few times, gradually reduce the amount of rest between each 100 in subsequent workouts, from 15 seconds rest to 5 seconds rest to 0 second rest. Sometimes in a very busy day, I don’t really want to think too hard in swim training, but the above main set contains practically everything you need to get through the swim portion of a triathlon. The build portion is designed to train you body to swim fast, for example, when you need to get around another swimmer. Distance per stroke helps with endurance swimming that one maximizes every stroke, gaining further distance for less effort. The fast portion is self-explanatory, by adding some speed work into one’s repertoire. The decelerate portion is designed to give one some way to recover before ramping up the swim speed again. This portion teaches you to recover while still making forward progress in the water. The goal is to reduce the amount of rest you need until the 25 decelerate becomes sufficient for your body to recover before moving into the next rep.

I hope the above gives many Barrelman racers some insights into the WIFC swim course as well as a simple way to train for the race. Happy swimming!

Chris Yuen, 2019 Barrelman Racer,

Buffalo Masters Swimming Club

USMS Certified Masters Swim Coach

[1]* Indicates the presence of a watch tower at this distance, which is ideal for sighting.

When Life and Training Doesn’t Go as Planned

By Angela Giddens

Triathlon season is short in Ontario. We train all year for 3 months of racing. With this training comes lots of planning, sacrifices and goal setting but as we all know too well, life doesn’t always go as planned.  

A nagging hamstring/ piriformis injury had me modifying my training early on this year, but that was ok. I knew I had lots of time to get back on track before race season and the ITU World Championship in Switzerland in August. I like to think I’ve gotten smarter over the years and I know enough to listen to my body. By May, I was finally getting some speed sessions in and I was feeling like I was back on track.  I was looking forward to racing and was even feeling confident enough in my training to register for the Barrelman Triathlon.

Life had other plans for me though, a personal crisis left me emotionally and physically drained. I knew then that my race season was not going to go as planned and I was faced with two options, throw in the towel or re-adjust my expectations. For me, triathlon is a part of who I am. I couldn’t imagine not having it as part of my life so I decided to throw out my training plan and my goals for the year and try to be happy with what I was able to do. Swimming, biking and running became more therapeutic in nature. I let my body and mind dictate what I was capable of on any given day.  

Before I knew it, it was the week of my first race, The Rose City long course, I had not put in the training I’d wanted and I was doubting if I’d be able to complete the race. A run that week reminded my that my piriformis also wasn’t sure if I’d be able to make it through the race. With a bunch of coaxing from my family and friends, I packed up and headed down to Welland. My swim and bike went better than expected, thanks in large part to the amazing race venue, but my run was less than stellar. I kept having to walk and stretch, I’ve never considered pulling out of a race but I sure did that day. It’s funny the little things that will motivate you to push on. An elderly gentleman who was volunteering at an aide station with some kind words, a gentleman who ran beside me for a bit and lots of ice all helped get me through to the finish. While it was not the race I’d envisioned at the end I was happy to have pushed through. Now, as I prepare for Gravenhurst this weekend, I know I’m still not where I want to be but I know I will get through the race and hopefully this time finish with a smile on my face. 

We all know we all race for different reasons, we all have our own goals. But what I have learnt this year is that we need to be prepared for those reasons and goals to change. Racing, as with life, doesn’t always go as planned. It’s up to us to push through and make the most of the hand we are dealt and remember to smile at the finish!

2018 Barrelman Niagara Falls Post Race Report

Produced by

 

With Thanks to Presenting Sponsor

2018 BARRELMAN NIAGARA FALLS

Hot! Hot! Hot! But Fun! Fun! Fun!

Thank you to everyone who raced with us in such amazingly hot conditions! You should be very proud of your accomplishment. A very special thanks to all of the volunteers, some of whom were in that hot sun for almost 9 hours. This race, or any other, would not survive without them. We hope to see all of you again in 2019!

RESULTS – September 16, 2018

BARRELMAN TRIATHLON
BARRELMAN RELAY
BARRELMAN SWIM BIKE
BARRELMAN BIKE RUN

If you haven’t already done so you can print your Finishers Certificate from the SportStats links above. Once you get to the results page click on your name then click on the certificate icon and print or download.

Read more

Previewing the 3rd Annual #BarrelmanTri – Sunday September 18

skechers-barrelman-rwm-logo-web

The Pro/Elite Race

The stage is set for tomorrow’s #BarrelmanTri. The professional/elite race will be an intriguing event. Check out the list of pros/elites expected to vie for the title.

Pro/Elite Women

Jennie Hansen (Rochester, NY)

2016 Ironman 70.3 Timberman 70.3 11th Pro Female

2016 Ironman 70.3 Racine 70.3 (no swim, shortened bike) 10th

2016 Ironman 70.3 Mont Tremblant 12th

2013 Ironman Lake Placid Champion

Angela Quick (Kitchener, ON)

2016 Ironman 70.3 Ohio 1st Overall Woman

2016 K-Town Long Course Triathlon 2nd

2016 Rose City Long Course Triathlon 1st

2016 Belwood Triathlon 1st

2016 Woodstock Triathlon 1st

Sheila Treleaven (Grimsby, ON)

2016 Ironman Mont Tremblant 2nd W40-44, 19th Woman Overall

2016 Ironman 70.3 Eagleman 2016, 1st 40-44 6th Woman OA

2105 Ironman 70.3 World Championships 2015 6th W40-44

2015 Ironman 70.3 Raleigh 1st W40-442014 Niagara Falls Barrelman Triathlon 4th Woman OA

Leah Sherriff (Ottawa, ON)

2016 Toronto Island Sprint Triathlon 2nd

2016 Ironman 70.3 Mont-Tremblant 15th – pro debut

2016 Ironman 70.3 Monterrey 1st W30-34, 13th Woman Overall to earn pro card

2015 Niagara Falls Barrelman 6th

Miranda Tomenson (Toronto, ON)

2016 Ironman 70.3 Calgary 10th

2016 Rose City Long Course Triathlon 2nd

2016 Bracebridge Olympic Triathlon 1st

2016 Toronto Island Sprint Triathlon 1st

2016 Woodstock Sprint Triathlon 2nd

Pro/Elite Men

Scott Bradley (Rochester, NY)

2016 Ironman Canada 11th Pro Male

2016 Ironman 70.3 Eagleman 8th

2016 Ironman 70.3 Raleigh 15th

Jackson Laundry (Guelph, ON)

2016 Rose City Long Course Triathlon 1st

2016 Gravenhurst Olympic Triathlon 1st

2016 ITU Ottawa National Championships 11th OA 8th CAN

2015 MultiSport Canada Elite Triathlon Series Winner

Nick Glavac (Mentor, OH)

2016 Ironman 70.3 Chattanooga 17th

2016 Cleveland Triathlon 1st

2015 Ironman 70.3 Muskoka 7th

Jordan Monnink (Ottawa, ON)

2016 Ironman 70.3 Eagleman 10th

2016 Ironman 70.3 Mont-Tremblant 10th

2016 K-Town Long Course Triathlon Champion

2016 Ironman 70.3 Timberman 9th

2015 Skechers Niagara Falls Barrelman 2nd

Alex VanderLinden (Kitchener, ON)

2016 Ironman 70.3 Chattanooga 12th place

2016 Bracebridge Triathlon Olympic Distance Champion

2015 Rose City Half Triathlon Champion

2015 K-Town Long Course Triathlon Champion

2015 Ironman 70.3 Muskoka Runner-up

John Salt’s #BarrelmanTri Story

skechers-barrelman-rwm-logo-web

President of MultiSport Canada, John Salt, talks to TJ Flynn about the Sketchers Performance Barrelman, presented by  Recharge With Milk, and tells the story of turning a vision for an epic race into reality.

LakesideJohnSalt
There’s a perch, an observation point with a sweeping view across the water, attached to one of the buildings at the Welland Flatwater Centre. Early on a fine Sunday morning last September, John Salt took a moment to climb the stairs to this private oratory.

His eyes stretched across the area below and were met with postcard images: transition filling with athletes; a knot of eager swimmers already wet and finding a feel for the clear water; spectators beginning to mill about the grandstand. There were familiar names and new faces scattered about and as a morning crested with excitement, beneath John Salt a vision was coming to life.

In what would be a busy, hectic-day for the MultiSport President, it was a standalone, personal moment and one that has remained with him in the year that has passed.

“That morning I just had this great feeling,” he says. “And on top of that little observation deck as I looked out, I actually teared up. It was a great moment for the series. I was realizing that this was a special race, a very unique race that we’d worked so hard to make happen.”

wifc swim
It was the second running of Sketchers Performance Barrelman, presented by Recharge With Milk, and even though the race was in it’s infancy, it was already becoming a mainstay on the multisport calendar for athletes across Ontario, and even for those further off towards neighbouring Canadian provinces and south to those States that straddle the border.

MultiSport Canada has carved out a reputation for creating well-run, friendly races with a family atmosphere and true to their word, even for a larger race such as Barrelman, they’ve remained loyal to this ethos.

From an athlete’s perspective, Barrelman is a highly-accessible half-distance race. Read more

Triathlon Ontario’s Long Course Series features Three of Our Races

Tri-On-Provincial-Champ-logo

Triathlon Ontario, the recognized Provincial Governing Body of Multisport in Ontario, announced the 2016 venues of its popular Long Course Series Championships.

The Series will consist of four events this year – including Rose City, K-Town, and Barrelman, with the best two results counting towards the points calculation.  Points are awarded based on finishing position in age groups within the top 20 placings.  Participants must be a member by the end of the last race for their results to be included in the final standings.

Winners of each division will have their names engraved on the permanent Long Course Series trophy, soon to be on public display at Triathlon Ontario’s home at the Milton Velodrome, as well as an individual trophy presented at the annual Awards Banquet.  In the inaugural year, over 420 members earned points in the competition.

Read more

Toronto Island Post-Race Report 2015

Quick link – Get the full Toronto Island Race Results.

First Timers bombard Toronto Island

Our first group of First Timers!

Thanks to all of you for supporting our Series and the 8th stop of the 2015 Recharge With Milk Triathlon Series.

With triathlon participation numbers plateauing, we were thrilled to welcome 100+ first timers at Toronto Island. We trust that you had an fun time out there, and we’d love to see you come back for more. Welcome to the Triathlon Family!

Read more

Barrelman voted Best Road Triathlon in Eastern Canada

GOT_RCA_winner_2014

According to the 2014 Get Out There Magazine Reader’s Choice Awards, The Niagara Falls Barrelman has been selected as the Best Road Triathlon in Eastern Canada.

Thanks to all who voted and who participated in the inaugural event last year.

Sign up for this year’s Niagara Falls Barrelman before the next price increase.